June 20, 2024


The rollout of Tesla’s advanced driver assistance technology Full Self-Drive and Autopilot has been fraught with issues. There have been high-profile videos of it struggling with city traffic, deadly crashes with the tech engaged and now a new video has surfaced of a FSD-equipped Tesla driving full-speed into a rail crossing.

In a post shared on the Tesla Motors Club forum, user cdotyii reports that their Tesla Model 3 has driven head-on into closed level crossings on two separate occasions. During the second incident, dashcam footage captured the car failing to slow for the flashing lights and almost slamming into the side of a passing goods train.

In the dash cam footage of the second crash, which occurred on May 8, a Tesla car is seen traveling along a very foggy road. In the distance, you can just about make out the flashing lights of a rail crossing, but the Tesla assistance system still hasn’t spotted them. As the car draws closer to the crossing, you begin to spot the closed barriers, and the outline of a train going through. Still, the Tesla hasn’t spotted the hazard ahead.

The crossing grows larger and larger as it gets closer, then at the very last minute, the driver has to take control and turn the car out the way of the train. They smashed through the barriers, damaging the front of their car and sustaining some back and arm bruising in the process. But, thankfully, they didn’t hit the train and lived to tell the tale.

Now, the driver is fed up with their car acting this way, and is seeking legal action over the two close calls they lived through. In their post on the Tesla Motors Club forum, they said:

I am looking for information on incidents involving Tesla’s Full Self-Driving (FSD) mode. I have owned my Tesla for less than a year, and within the last six months, it has twice attempted to drive directly into a passing train while in FSD mode. The most recent incident occurred on May 8, 2024, and I have dash cam footage from that event.

I am trying to obtain the telemetry data from these incidents. Additionally, I am looking for similar cases or incidents. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to find a lawyer willing to take my case due to the lack of significant injuries — only backaches and a deep bruise on my right elbow, which didn’t require medical attention.

Alongside their post, user cdotyii shared an image of their car in the aftermath of the run-in with a level crossing. The close-call left the front left corner of the Model 3 in tatters, with a wheel hanging off and damage to the fender, light and bumper.

The crash is just the latest shortcoming for Tesla’s Autopilot and FSD systems, which are currently only available here in the U.S.

Last month, the tech was linked to a deadly crash involving a former Tesla engineer. Despite the number of crashes involving FSD and Autopilot mounting, Tesla is still determined to expand the software’s reach around the world. Now, regulatory hurdles are being cleared in China for its launch across the country.

A version of this article originally appeared on Jalopnik.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *